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Thursday
Jun212018

West Rutland Marsh - June 2018

Eastern KingbirdWe say it every year - it’s hard to beat June at West Rutland Marsh! Birds are still singing and the nesting season is in full swing so there is plenty to hear and see. Fifteen observers tallied 64 species, three more than our average for this month of the year and four more than last June. Our high for Mourning DoveJune was 69 species in 2009.

Waterfowl for the day consisted of one mallard and one hooded merganser, a female. There was no sign, or sound, of the Canada geese that were spotted with young earlier in the season. No doubt we will see the geese again when October rolls around.

As we walked down Marble Street, a least bittern flew over the road near the power line. It was a quick, but satisfactory look, a first for some of us and a highlight for all. Our other bittern, the American bittern, gave us a flight show over Water Street later in the walk. A green heron and a great blue heron were seen as well.

A Virginia rail was heard from the boardwalk where the marsh wrens and swamps sparrows are as vocal as they were a month ago.

Another highlight for the morning came when we heard the sound of young woodpeckers in a cavity and then watched as a male downy woodpecker came in with food.

Other nesting activity included a mourning dove carrying nesting material, recently fledged phoebes and a veery, a gray catbird, and a red-winged blackbird each carrying food for its young.

Red-winged BlackbirdHouse wrens were heard in three locations while a winter wren gave out one burst of song along Marble Street.

Several warbler species were seen and/or heard. We counted 14 common yellowthroats, 10 American redstarts, 10 yellow warblers and eight black-and-white warblers. A single Canada warbler, a species that has eluded us earlier this season, was spotted along Whipple Hollow Road. Two northern waterthrushes were singing in this area as well. Chestnut-sided warblers and several ovenbirds were also observed.

The morning concluded with a belted kingfisher hovering over open water, followed by an osprey soaring over and then disappearing to the north. 

Our next walk is scheduled for Saturday, July 14, 7 a.m.

Today’s list:

 

Mallard  1
Hooded Merganser  1
American Bittern  1
Least Bittern  1    
Great Blue Heron  1
Green Heron  1
Turkey Vulture  2
Osprey  1
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Virginia Rail  1
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  2
Mourning Dove  15
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
Belted Kingfisher  2
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  5
Downy Woodpecker  4
Hairy Woodpecker  2
Northern Flicker  1    Heard only.
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
Alder Flycatcher  4
Willow Flycatcher  3
Eastern Phoebe  6
Great Crested Flycatcher  1
Eastern Kingbird  3
Warbling Vireo  2
Red-eyed Vireo  12
Blue Jay  5
American Crow  6
Common Raven  1
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  4
Tree Swallow  4
Barn Swallow  9
Black-capped Chickadee  7
Tufted Titmouse  4
House Wren  3
Winter Wren  1
Marsh Wren  7
Eastern Bluebird  2
Veery  12
Wood Thrush  2
American Robin  17
Gray Catbird  13
European Starling  2
Cedar Waxwing  11
Ovenbird  4
Northern Waterthrush  2
Black-and-white Warbler  8
Common Yellowthroat  14
American Redstart  10
Yellow Warbler  10
Chestnut-sided Warbler  2
Canada Warbler  1
Chipping Sparrow  1
Song Sparrow  12
Swamp Sparrow  21
Northern Cardinal  5
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  4
Indigo Bunting  2
Baltimore Oriole  2
Red-winged Blackbird  28
Brown-headed Cowbird  3
Common Grackle  8
American Goldfinch  23
House Sparrow  1

 

 

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