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Entries in Bird Monitoring (48)

Saturday
Apr222017

West Rutland Marsh - April Monitoring Report

It’s hard to say which was more amazing – the number of species or the number of birders – at today’s walk around West Rutland Marsh!

Thirty-six birders, from age 7 to 89, showed up despite the somewhat gloomy weather (the rain held off until the very end). Fortunately, there was no wind and, as the bird song has noticeably increased since last month, it turned out to be a very pleasant morning. There were plenty of new faces as well as a contingent from Otter Creek Audubon

Fifty-three species were tallied, a new April high, well above our average of 42 for this month of the year. It is also eight more than observed a year ago this month.

Two of the marsh’s signature species, Virginia rail and American bittern, were heard immediately from the boardwalk. We later saw a bittern in flight near the intersection of Whipple Hollow and Water streets.

Raptors were well-represented with two northern harriers, one sharp-shinned hawk, one red-shouldered hawk (not commonly observed on this walk), one red-tailed hawk and one American kestrel.

Tree SwallowsOne of the highlights of the walk was a flock of 63 tree swallows, accompanied by a handful of barn swallows and northern rough-winged swallows, swirling over Water Street, and occasionally landing in a tree.

Ruby-crowned kinglets were everywhere along the route as they have been throughout Vermont this week. One golden-crowned kinglet was also heard. Two marsh wrens were singing as well as three winter wrens and a blue-headed vireo. A brown creeper was singing as well.

A pair of eastern bluebirds was investigating a bird house, a spot where they have nested in previous years. A hermit thrush, our state bird, has also returned.

The advance front of warblers is in - yellow-rumped warblers with three seen along the route.

Twenty-six swamp sparrows were counted, all in enthusiastic song, so no doubt some females were missed. Song sparrows were heard or spotted along the route, while a couple of American tree sparrows are still hanging around the feeders near the boardwalk.

Another sign of spring was bloodroot in bloom and the budding marsh marigolds.

The next walk is scheduled for Thursday, May 18, at 7 a.m.

Today’s list:

Canada Goose  32
Wood Duck  4
Mallard  4
Ruffed Grouse  2
American Bittern  3
Great Blue Heron  1
Turkey Vulture  3
Northern Harrier  2
Sharp-shinned Hawk  1
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Virginia Rail  4
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  4
Mourning Dove  10
Belted Kingfisher  2
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  4
Downy Woodpecker  6
Northern Flicker  3
American Kestrel  1
Eastern Phoebe  5
Blue-headed Vireo  1
Blue Jay  6
American Crow  9
Common Raven  1
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  6
Tree Swallow  86    
Barn Swallow  10
Black-capped Chickadee  17
Tufted Titmouse  7
White-breasted Nuthatch  2
Brown Creeper  1
Winter Wren  3
Marsh Wren  2
Golden-crowned Kinglet  1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  21    
Eastern Bluebird  3
Hermit Thrush  1
American Robin  17
Brown Thrasher  1
European Starling  7
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)  4
American Tree Sparrow  2
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored)  7
White-throated Sparrow  5
Song Sparrow  17
Swamp Sparrow  26    
Northern Cardinal  9
Red-winged Blackbird  41
Common Grackle  8
Brown-headed Cowbird  5
Purple Finch  2
American Goldfinch  14
House Sparrow  1

 

 

Thursday
Mar232017

west rutland marsh - march monitoring report

American Tree SparrowIt was a bit hard to tell we are the third day of spring during today’s monitoring walk around West Rutland Marsh. The morning started at 9 degrees and the ground is mostly snow-covered. Fortunately, no wind and a bright sun helped mitigate the wintry feeling.

Twenty-five species were tallied, six less than last year’s March walk, but two above our average of 23.

American tree sparrows are still around, enjoying the various feeders along the route. A quick look at eBird shows we will be graced by their presence well into April. Listen for their song which they will start singing here before heading north. You can listen to their song here. One tree sparrow was on the ice apparently eating snow as there is no open water.

On the summer side of sparrows, three song sparrows were seen, but none were heard singing. Northern cardinals and tufted titmice, however, were singing vigorously.

We counted 26 chickadees including one eating the tiny seeds of a cattail. Six white-breasted nuthatches were seen, mostly in pairs.

Seven wild turkeys were observed marching in a straight line across a field and into the woods.Red-winged Blackbird

Red-bellied woodpeckers have been a regular species at the marsh now. Two were seen today. Other woodpeckers were heard drumming Hairy? Downy? Something to relearn every year!

No raptors were seen, but their absence was filled by six common ravens soaring over the marsh.

Red-winged blackbirds are already staking out their territories in the cattails. A few females were seen and are no doubt looking over their options. Brown-headed cowbirds were seen elbowing their way into the seed at feeder on Whipple Hollow Road.

The next marsh walk is scheduled for Saturday, April 22, at 8 a.m.

 

 

 

 

 

Today’s list: 

Ruffed Grouse  1
Wild Turkey  7
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  4
Mourning Dove  11
Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
Downy Woodpecker  5
Hairy Woodpecker  2
Blue Jay  16
American Crow  8
Common Raven  6
Black-capped Chickadee  26
Tufted Titmouse  6
White-breasted Nuthatch  6
Brown Creeper  1
American Robin  3
European Starling  7
American Tree Sparrow  7
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored)  3
Song Sparrow  3
Northern Cardinal  6
Red-winged Blackbird  31
Common Grackle  8
Brown-headed Cowbird  5
American Goldfinch  11
House Sparrow  5

 

 

Saturday
Nov192016

west rutland marsh - november monitoring report

Birders almost equaled bird species for RCAS’s monthly monitoring walk around West Rutland Marsh this morning. With clear skies and the forecast promising temperatures in the 60s, no one minded much.

Nineteen observers counted 21 species. Although this seems low it still beats last year’s 19 which is also our 16-year average. Past November walks have yielded anywhere from 11 to 27 species.

There were no real surprises. Raptors consisted of five red-tailed hawks and one Cooper’s hawk.

A belted kingfisher was seen from the boardwalk as it flew from Water Street to the power lines. A northern flicker was heard and a red-bellied woodpecker was seen.

Eastern bluebirds were heard singing, but not seen.  Sparrows were represented by three American tree sparrows and a lone junco.

The next walk is scheduled for Thursday, December 8.

Today’s list:

Mallard  4
Cooper's Hawk  1
Red-tailed Hawk  5
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  6
Mourning Dove  4
Belted Kingfisher  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  4
Northern Flicker  1
Blue Jay  23
American Crow  9
Common Raven  2
Black-capped Chickadee  43
Tufted Titmouse  1
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
Eastern Bluebird  2
European Starling  20
American Tree Sparrow  3
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored)  1
Northern Cardinal  4
American Goldfinch  20

Sunday
Oct162016

west rutland marsh - october monitoring report

The fall foliage is still brilliant on the hillsides, but the crystal coating on the cattails and other marsh vegetation this morning was a reminder of what is to come. Eighteen participants, sporting wool caps and warm gloves for the first time this season, joined together for our monthly monitoring of West Rutland Marsh.

Today’s tally was 37, three more than one year ago, and five more than our average for October (the high was 39 in October 2007).

Many species have departed or are at least packing their bags. In sharp contrast with September, only one gray catbird was recorded. No common yellowthroats or marsh wrens were observed, but a swamp sparrow sang weakly in the cattails.

Several ruby-crowned kinglets were flitting in the trees and goldenrod seedheads along with a few golden-crowned kinglets. Their contrasting call notes were quite obvious.

White-throated sparrows and dark-eyed juncos were seen in several spots along the route as well as song sparrows. Our first vesper sparrow for this walk was seen briefly along Marble Street. This is the third month in a row we have added a new species to our monitoring list.

Three purple finches, the two males looking particularly bright in the morning sun, sat in a bare tree. One was heard singing.

Three red-tailed hawks were noted, but no turkey vultures.

Our next walk: November 19 (Saturday) at 8 a.m.

Today’s list:

Canada Goose  2
Wood Duck  2
Mallard  2
Red-tailed Hawk  3
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  6
Mourning Dove  6
Belted Kingfisher  2
Downy Woodpecker  6
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Peregrine Falcon  1
Eastern Phoebe  1
Blue Jay  19
American Crow  45
Common Raven  4
Black-capped Chickadee  25
Tufted Titmouse  2
White-breasted Nuthatch  3
Brown Creeper  1
Carolina Wren  1
Golden-crowned Kinglet  4
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  5
American Robin  65
Gray Catbird  1
European Starling  3
Chipping Sparrow  1
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored)  17
White-crowned Sparrow  2
White-throated Sparrow  10
Vesper Sparrow  1
Song Sparrow  9
Swamp Sparrow  2
Northern Cardinal  5
Red-winged Blackbird  49
Purple Finch  4
American Goldfinch  17

Thursday
Sep222016

west rutland marsh - september monitoring report

It was a glorious first day of autumn at West Rutland Marsh! Forty-five species beat last year by three and our September average of 39. We originally thought the day’s tally was 44, but a photo later revealed we actually had one additional species, a northern parula. Thirteen lucky participants all contributed to the total.

The day started with two tussling marsh wrens near the boardwalk, perhaps an immature still begging food of an adult?

One of the highlights of the day was Philadelphia vireo, with a nearby red-eyed vireo for contrast. They were both feeding frantically, but we had good looks at each. It was a life bird for some participants. Two warbling vireos were singing weakly.

Swamp SparrowRed-winged blackbird and blue jay numbers were high with 243 and 69, respectively.

Warblers included the parula, a black-throated green warbler, a magnolia warbler, a chestnut-sided warbler and several common yellowthroats.

Gray catbirds are still around in good numbers – 14 (last year we counted 13). Swamp sparrows are stilling singing away as well as a few marsh wrens. White-throated sparrows are putting in an appearance as the season changes.

Raptor numbers were low, one in fact, a sharp-shinned hawk.

Species #151 for our monitoring walk appeared today: an immature northern mockingbird, keeping company with starlings. At first we thought it was a juvenile starling, but its long tail and white wing patches gave it away.

The next monitoring walk is scheduled for Saturday, October 15, at 8 a.m.

Today’s list:

Canada Goose  9
Wood Duck  12
Mallard  7
Great Blue Heron  2
Sharp-shinned Hawk  1
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  2
Mourning Dove  6
Belted Kingfisher  2
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1
Downy Woodpecker  8
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  2
Eastern Phoebe  9
Philadelphia Vireo  1    
Warbling Vireo  2    
Red-eyed Vireo  3
Blue Jay  69
American Crow  4
Common Raven  3
Black-capped Chickadee  15
Red-breasted Nuthatch  2
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
House Wren  1
Marsh Wren  3
American Robin  1
Gray Catbird  14
Northern Mockingbird  1    
European Starling  5
Cedar Waxwing  2
Common Yellowthroat  4
Magnolia Warbler  1
Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
Black-throated Green Warbler  1
White-throated Sparrow  3
Song Sparrow  5
Swamp Sparrow  15
Northern Cardinal  2
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
Red-winged Blackbird  243
House Finch  1
Purple Finch  1
American Goldfinch  9
House Sparrow  1