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Friday
Mar312017

art show: our natural world in art

Rutland County Audubon will be holding its own wildlife art show Our Natural World in Art this coming May!

Visual artists, professional and non-professional, in any medium, including photography, painting and sculpture, are invited to submit up to three works to be included in an open art show featuring nature and wildlife at Stone Valley Arts at Fox Hill in Poultney, Vermont from May 26 through June 11, sponsored by RCAS. Solely scenic landscapes are excluded. Works need not be for sale. Those offered for sale are subject to a 40% gallery commission (split between RCAS and Stone Valley Arts) or donated proceeds if sold (80% to RCAS and 20% to Stone Valley Arts. Delivery of works will be May 21 and May 22. For details please contact us by May 1 at birding@rutlandcountyaudubon.org.

The show will open with a reception on Friday, May 26, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Hours that weekend (coinciding with Open Studio Weekend) will be Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The show will also be open the following two weekends, June 3 and 4, and June 10 and 11, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Stone Valley Arts at Fox Hill is located at 145 E. Main Street, Poultney.

Whether you are an artists or an art lover, we hope to see you at Stone Valley Arts later this spring!

Thursday
Mar232017

west rutland marsh - march monitoring report

American Tree SparrowIt was a bit hard to tell we are the third day of spring during today’s monitoring walk around West Rutland Marsh. The morning started at 9 degrees and the ground is mostly snow-covered. Fortunately, no wind and a bright sun helped mitigate the wintry feeling.

Twenty-five species were tallied, six less than last year’s March walk, but two above our average of 23.

American tree sparrows are still around, enjoying the various feeders along the route. A quick look at eBird shows we will be graced by their presence well into April. Listen for their song which they will start singing here before heading north. You can listen to their song here. One tree sparrow was on the ice apparently eating snow as there is no open water.

On the summer side of sparrows, three song sparrows were seen, but none were heard singing. Northern cardinals and tufted titmice, however, were singing vigorously.

We counted 26 chickadees including one eating the tiny seeds of a cattail. Six white-breasted nuthatches were seen, mostly in pairs.

Seven wild turkeys were observed marching in a straight line across a field and into the woods.Red-winged Blackbird

Red-bellied woodpeckers have been a regular species at the marsh now. Two were seen today. Other woodpeckers were heard drumming Hairy? Downy? Something to relearn every year!

No raptors were seen, but their absence was filled by six common ravens soaring over the marsh.

Red-winged blackbirds are already staking out their territories in the cattails. A few females were seen and are no doubt looking over their options. Brown-headed cowbirds were seen elbowing their way into the seed at feeder on Whipple Hollow Road.

The next marsh walk is scheduled for Saturday, April 22, at 8 a.m.

 

 

 

 

 

Today’s list: 

Ruffed Grouse  1
Wild Turkey  7
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  4
Mourning Dove  11
Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
Downy Woodpecker  5
Hairy Woodpecker  2
Blue Jay  16
American Crow  8
Common Raven  6
Black-capped Chickadee  26
Tufted Titmouse  6
White-breasted Nuthatch  6
Brown Creeper  1
American Robin  3
European Starling  7
American Tree Sparrow  7
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored)  3
Song Sparrow  3
Northern Cardinal  6
Red-winged Blackbird  31
Common Grackle  8
Brown-headed Cowbird  5
American Goldfinch  11
House Sparrow  5

 

 

Monday
Mar202017

patagonia picnic table effect

What do picnic tables have to do with birds? The Patagonia Picnic Table Effect is an expression that longtime birders know as the phenomenon of one ‘good’ bird attracting more birds. What it really means is the ‘good,’ or rare bird, will attract more birders who will in turn find more birds. It has its roots with a sighting of a black-capped gnatcatcher at a rest area in Patagonia, Arizona. It was an unusual sighting even for that very birdy area. Subsequent visitors to the rest area found more and more species as word of the gnatcatcher spread.

Rutland County recently had its own version of the Patagonia Picnic Table Effect. In the second week of March an alert observer noticed a swan in a flooded area off Route 73 in Brandon. Mute swans occur occasionally in Vermont, but they are not a native species and are often unwanted because of the habitat destruction they can cause. Tundra swans pass through the state on migration, infrequently, but not unexpectedly.

This swan was a bit different and expert birders, aided by today’s digital photography, determined that the Brandon swan was a trumpeter swan. Trumpeter swans are the largest of our North American swans and the shape of its beak is different, longer and straighter than a tundra swan’s beak. Further, if accepted by the Vermont Bird Records Committee, this will be only the second state record of trumpeter swan in Vermont, the other seen in Addison County on Lake Champlain in May 2014.

Kent McFarland of the Vermont Center for Ecostudies noted that reintroduction efforts in Ontario and the Great Lakes may mean that more trumpeter swans could be seen in Vermont in the future if reintroduction efforts ares successful.

As of March 20, 37 other species have been observed at the site of the trumpeter swan in Brandon. Many are the expected species such as nuthatches, woodpeckers and chickadees. Others reflect the changing season and consist of returning waterfowl, including wood duck, northern pintail, green-winged teal, bufflehead and both hooded and common merganser. Not to mention a good number of mallards, American black ducks and Canada geese!

Robins, a northern harrier and an American kestrel were seen. Red-winged blackbirds and common grackles were reported in high numbers. Most unusual was a golden eagle spotted at the site on the 9th and again on the 12th.

Just as impressive though, and maybe more important, is the fact that 65 eBird checklists were submitted, checklists that contain not only the swan, but the other species noted at the time.

Trumpeter swans may be expanding their range. We hope they do. We would love to see more of them. But if the occurrence of a rare species means more reports of the species we expect in Vermont so much the better.

Note: the swan was still present as of March 20. 

Tuesday
Jan312017

rcas wildlife art show - call to artists

Rutland County Audubon will be holding its own wildlife art show this coming May!

Visual artists, professional and amateur, in any medium, including photography, painting and sculpture, are invited to submit up to three works to be included in an open art show featuring nature and wildlife at Stone Valley Arts in Poultney, Vermont from May 26 through June 11, sponsored by RCAS. Solely scenic landscapes are excluded. Works need not be for sale. Those offered for sale are subject to a 40% gallery commission. Delivery of works will be May 21 and May 22. For details contact birding@rutlandcountyaudubon.org.

The show will be held on weekends with an opening reception on Friday, May, 26. Details on hours to follow.

Saturday
Jan282017

west rutland marsh - january monitoring report

Sometimes the best comes last. A surprising 17 people showed up for today’s monitoring walk around West Rutland Marsh. We are now halfway through our 16th year! Twenty-two species were tallied, one more than last year and four more than our January average.

Many of the ‘usual suspects’ were seen or heard including singing tufted titmice and 31 very active chickadees. American tree sparrows were also singing parts of their song. Eastern bluebirds were heard and seen briefly in flight.

Our only raptor of the day was a red-tailed hawk, but a pair of ravens was engaged in synchronized aerobatics.

The woodpeckers were represented by hairy, downy and red-bellied woodpecker, the last a species we are seeing more of at the marsh.

A ruffed grouse was surprised by the side of Whipple Hollow Road. So were the birders.

And the best and last bird of the day? An adult bald eagle soaring in lazy circles over the marsh.

Next month’s walk is scheduled for Saturday, February 18, at 8 a.m. The walk will be held in conjunction with the Great Backyard Bird Count.

 

 

 

Today’s list:

Mallard  2
Ruffed Grouse  1
Bald Eagle  1
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  3
Mourning Dove  9
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  4
Hairy Woodpecker  2
Blue Jay  9
American Crow  13
Common Raven  3
Black-capped Chickadee  31
Tufted Titmouse  5
White-breasted Nuthatch  4
Eastern Bluebird  7
American Robin  1
American Tree Sparrow  5
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored)  3
Northern Cardinal  3
American Goldfinch  21
House Sparrow  4