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Saturday
Jun102017

West Rutland Marsh - June 2017

Cedar WaxwingJust when you think you couldn’t possibly add new species for our monthly monitoring walks around West Rutland Marsh, now in our 16th year, two more show up!

Seventeen participants, on one of the all too few beautiful weather days this season, tallied 61 species. This equals our average for June, but is not the highest number recorded for this month of the year. That record stands at 66 species in both 2013 and 2015.

Except for the chatter of marsh wrens, the morning started somewhat quietly on the boardwalk. A single Virginia rail was heard (although two more were heard later in the morning). Both alder and willow flycatchers were nearby so it was a good opportunity to compare their vocalizations.

Ruby-throated HummingbirdA short distance down Marble Street, on the east side of the road, and before the power line crossing, the low chuckling of a least bittern was heard. No American bitterns were observed, but one green heron and one great blue heron were seen in flight as we returned to the boardwalk later in the morning.

The raptor count was low – one red-tailed hawk. Several common ravens were seen. No doubt the young are off the nest. A single turkey vulture was observed.

Cedar waxwings were found in several places along the route.

The warbler count was high – 12 species in all. Common yellowthroats and yellow warblers led the way of course with 19 and 16, respectively. Eleven American redstarts were counted. Canada warbler and northern waterthrush were each singing at their usual spots on Whipple Hollow Road. A golden-winged warbler/blue-winged warbler was heard, but not seen on the east side of Marble Street, with the song coming from suitable brushy habitat.

And the two, new species? Mourning warbler and Louisiana waterthrush! The first was heard on the west side of Whipple Hollow Road just after we turned the corner from Pleasant Street. The song of a Louisiana waterthrush was coming from a stream that runs behind a house further south on Whipple Hollow.

Our next walk is scheduled for Thursday, July 20, at 7 a.m.

Today’s list: 

Mallard  4
Least Bittern  1 
Great Blue Heron  1
Green Heron  1
Turkey Vulture  1
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Virginia Rail  3
Mourning Dove  14
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  3
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  2
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
Alder Flycatcher  5
Willow Flycatcher  6
Least Flycatcher  2
Eastern Phoebe  4
Eastern Kingbird  5
Warbling Vireo  2
Red-eyed Vireo  17
Blue Jay  6
American Crow  3
Common Raven  6
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  1
Tree Swallow  6
Barn Swallow  9
Black-capped Chickadee  9
House Wren  6
Marsh Wren  8
Veery  5
Wood Thrush  2
American Robin  5
Gray Catbird  8
European Starling  4
Cedar Waxwing  20
Ovenbird  5
Louisiana Waterthrush  1    
Northern Waterthrush  1
Golden-winged/Blue-winged Warbler  1    
Black-and-white Warbler  4
Mourning Warbler  1
Common Yellowthroat  19
American Redstart  11
Yellow Warbler  16
Chestnut-sided Warbler  3
Black-throated Green Warbler  1
Canada Warbler  1
Chipping Sparrow  2
Song Sparrow  9
Swamp Sparrow  17
Northern Cardinal  4
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  2
Indigo Bunting  1
Red-winged Blackbird  17
Common Grackle  8
Brown-headed Cowbird  2
Baltimore Oriole  3
House Finch  1
American Goldfinch  9
House Sparrow  1

 

 

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